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[In completing this Worksheet, it is recommended that a second window be opened (in MS Explorer and Firefox enter Ctrl-N).
One Window can contain the Worksheet, while the second window is used to search the Library Catalogue.]

[ questions: 1-2 | 3-5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 ]

[ subjects: Keyword Search (& holdings) | Call Number Search ]
[  to access Library Catalogue  ]


Music 1253 Worksheet no. 5. Acadia Library Online Computer Catalogue 3.

Acadia Library Online Computer Catalogue (WebCat), con'd.

Worksheets 3 and 4 introduced some methods for finding items in the Acadia Library Online Computer Catalogue (WebCat).
Worksheet 5 continues these exercises.

Like Worksheets 3 and 4, this tutorial is NOT intended as instruction in the actual use of the computers or the library catalogue itself. Library Reference staff will assist with questions concerning the online catalogue and the Library. This tutorial is intended only to provide drill in the use of this catalogue in the study of music.

Using the instructions given in Worksheet 3, access the Library Computer Catalogue.

  You can access the Library Computer Catalogue from any computer attached to the Internet, normally using MS Explorer, Firefox or another WWW browser.

In the Library:

Often the computers in the Reference Section are at an appropriate place to begin. If in doubt, if already in the Online Computer Catalogue, click on the NEW SEARCH button.


KEYWORD SEARCHING (& HOLDINGS):

Searches using the names of many authors, subjects, etc. may result in a very great number of entries.

For example, a search using BACH JOHANN SEBASTIAN as the search AUTHOR term, yields more than 300 entries.

In such cases, it is better to use a Keyword Search.
Note: this is the screen that opens automatically when a user enters WebCat, and when the user clicks the NEW SEARCH button.

Click the NEW SEARCH button to get the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen.

Because of the way in which the Library data base is organized, some keyword searches can be tricky.

A good sample of how tricky this can be is searching for the complete works of a composer. (This is significant, as the Complete Works, also called Collected Works, are the most reliable and important resource in studying a composerís music.)

Because these may have titles of various sorts (The Complete Works of..., The Collected Works of..., The Music of..., etc., etc. and because these are published in several languages, it is very difficult to predict what should go in the various possible choices in the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen.

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In the case of Complete Works, it is necessary to do the following:

  1. In the box beside the one labelled author (probably the second row), put the composerís Name.
  2. For this exercise, use William Byrd.

    [Remember to enter the last name first.]

  3. Go to the third row, probably labelled title.
  4. Click on the little down arrow on the right side of the box, and change the option to author.

    (So both second and third rows will have author as option.)

  5. Put  works  in the right-hand side box of the third row.

For Byrd, this should look like this:

 

Click here to see image

 

Then click on the Search Catalogue button at the bottom.

This will yield various items, usually including the composerís Complete Works.
These can be identfied by the Call Number, which for complete works usually begins with M3 . ... etc.
In addition, these will usually be called Works of... or Collected Works... or Complete Works..., etc. in various languages: Werke..., Sšmtliche Werke..., Ausgabe..., Oeuvres complŤtes..., etc.

Variations are possible. Complete Editions of one type of a composerís works, such as the complete vocal music, will have a Call Number beginning M3.1 . ... etc.

Some Complete Works are part of larger historical series. In these cases, the Call Number will probably begin with M2 . ... etc.

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For example, the Call Number of the Collected works of Henry Butler is M2 .R238 v.66 because this edition is vol. 66 of the larger series, Recent Researches in the Music of the Baroque Era.

 

(Going back to the exercise with Byrd's works) one can get the same result by entering all on one row:

author: byrd william and works

Click here to see image

 

Then click on the Search Catalogue button at the bottom.

You will note that there are three editions with a call number beginning M3 . ..., The Byrd Edition, The Collected Works of William Byrd, and Collected Vocal Works of William Byrd. [Strictly speaking, the last set, Collected Vocal Works of William Byrd, should have a call number beginning M3.1 . ... .]

Using the most recent Complete Works of Byrd (The Byrd edition), one can use the Holdings list to determine which volumes the Library owns.

Click on the Details button  Details   for The Byrd edition.
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Scroll down to the Copy   Material   Location list, or click on the link, holdings.

1. For Byrd, does the library own Vol. 14?

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2. Give the overall Call Number (i.e., without the volume part of the number) for this whole set (The Byrd edition).
[Be very careful about the spacing and placement of the dot. The dot is not a period; the dot is a decimal point, so after a space.]

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[Note that the part beginning " .B992..." is referring to the name "Byrd".]

 

It is not always this straight forward!

With some Collected Editions of Works, such as those of J.S. Bach, there are two (or more) entries because the complete works also include a series of documents and/or a separate set of critical commentaries (editorial matter).

Sets also will have several entries if the sets are published in more than one series (such as the works of Mozart which are published in a great number of series, parts, and sub-series).

It is also possible, as with Byrd's works, that the Library will have more than one set of a composerís works.

Sometimes, as in the case of Händel, the volumes each have their own entry in the Library data base. For these, each volume will come up separately.

Try another Keyword search.

Often we may know a portion of the information needed to name or identify an object.

For example, we may know that a composer in the Lawes family (but, which one?) composed a piece that had something about "Peace" in the title.

At the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen, Enter:

author: Lawes

title: Peace [You may need to reset the tab from author to title.]

Leave the search operators (at the end of the lines) as AND. [This means that both terms will be searched.]

Select the Search Catalogue button.

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This should produce a book, score, or other item that contains the work sought.

You may need to click on one or more Details buttons  Details   to find the Title of the piece.

3. What is the proper complete title for this work?

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4. What is the date of this work [the original piece of music, not the date of the book in the Library]?

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5. What is the full name of the composer of this work?

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The Boolean search operator NOT may be used to narrow a search.

As an example, consider that one wished to find several sonatas but was not interested in the more common sonatas for piano or violin. If one simply enters "sonata" into a title search, WebCat supplies a great many entries.

By narrowing a search, we are left with far fewer, more specific items to consider.

At the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen, enter:

title: sonata

Click here to see image

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6. How many Titles does this produce?

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GO BACK.

At the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen, enter (probably already there) in title box:

title: sonata

change the tab at the end of this row to:

Not

change the tab at the beginning of the next row to:

title:

and put in the second box on this row:

piano

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Click here to see image

Notice that this reduces the number of items.

7. How many items does this produce?

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GO BACK.

Try this slightly differently.
At the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen, enter (probably already there) in title box:

title: sonata

Make sure the tab at the end of this row is:

Not

change the tab at the beginning of the next row to:

word(s) anywhere:

and put in the second box on this row (probably already there):

piano

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Click here to see image

8. How many items does this produce?

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GO BACK.

Now add the violin to be excluded.
At the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen, enter (probably already there) in title box:

title: sonata

Make sure the tab at the end of this row is:

Not

Make sure the tab at the beginning of the next row is:

word(s) anywhere:

and put in the second box on this row (probably already there):

piano

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Change the tab at the end of this row to:

Not

Change the tab at the beginning of the next row to:

word(s) anywhere:

and put in the second box on this row:

violin

Click here to see image

Notice that this further reduces the number of items.

9. How many items does this produce?

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CALL NUMBER Searches:

The last option considered on this worksheet for searching is Call No.

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This is useful for locating books on particular topics, and especially for locating scores of music for specific ensembles and for collected works, since each type will share a common Call Number first line.

Click on the NEW SEARCH button to return to the Search the Library Catalogue and Archives screen.

Select the CALL NO. BROWSE tab.

to get to the Browse Catalogue by Call Number screen.

Click here to see image

Remembering that M3 is the Classification for composersí complete works, one can find these by:

Entering M3, a space, and a point (decimal point) followed by the first letter of the composersís last name.

For example, enter M3 .S

Click here to see image

Then click the Browse Shelves button.

10. Name Five (5) composers with last name beginning with S, of which the Acadia Library has five or more volumes (each) of their collected works.

[You will need to click on the FORWARD button several times to find five composers who each have five volumes or more in their complete works in the Acadia Library.]

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[Total: / 100]


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Because there is so much explanation on this Worksheet, it is easy to miss some questions.
Check to ensure that you have answered all questions.
Make sure you have entered your name at the top of the Worksheet.
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Last updated: 10 September 2006.  
Copyright © 2006 by Gordon J. Callon. All rights reserved. e-mail: gordon.callon @ acadiau.ca
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