E-mail Address:
Name:
This information is essential so the assignment can be identified.
Gordon J. Callon


site map



[ Go to Questions: 1 (terms), 2 ]


Music 1253 Worksheet no. 11
Dictionaries, Encyclopaedia, and other Reference Books, Part 2

The purpose of Worksheets no. 11-15 is to help the student become familiar with the types of reference sources available, the types of material covered in them, the extent and depth of coverage in each, and their relative merits.
Students are advised to make special note of sources which are of particular value, and to note those which are of less value. Special features of each reference source also should be noted.
It should soon become apparent that no single, or even a few sources, can be expected to provide complete information on any topic.

* Reference sources in a language other than English can be very helpful, even if the reader cannot read the language. Often there is information-such as illustrations, musical examples, lists of works, and bibliographies, for which the actual language is not needed. Frequently much can be figured out after reading several English definitions and explanations and simply applying the information.
 
 



* Note: In each of the following, when definitions are required, put the definition into your own words (paraphrase). Avoid simply quoting. Be as brief as possible.
 
  If it is necessary to quote even a small fragment, be sure to use quotation marks always, and cite the exact source.
 
  1. In the box below, provide a brief yet thorough description or explanation of the term assigned to you according to the following directions.
    Be sure to describe the term as it applies to western music before 1700. A thorough description should include a brief explanation of the meaning, a comment on when and where the thing described occurred, and at least two examples of music (naming composer and title, with opus number or other identification) that serve as examples of the thing described. Be sure to find definitions or explanations of each term in three, or more (more is better), independent sources.
/ 65

[If you are using a printed version of this Worksheet, do each question on the reverse of the sheets of paper.]

Selection:

Top

To keep the search interesting, each student in the class will describe or explain a different term.

To ensure this, each student will select the name from the list below that begins with the same one, two, or three letters as the first one, two, or three letters of the student's last name.

Select as many letters as possible. If this is not successful, select another useful letter of the alphabet, closest to the correct letter. [For example, I would search for terms that begin Ca.... If this did not work, I would then search for a term beginning Ce... (etc.).]

Be as complete, precise, and concise as possible. (Be sure to provide adequate information in proportion to the point value of this item of the Worksheet. It is best to include the names of one or more composers and pieces that represent or illustrate the term described.)

To prepare the answer to this question, look at more than three independent sources.

Your answer should be a combination of the answers in these sources.

[Note: an independent source is one with a different author and is clearly not derived from another. For example, many of the articles in The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments are revisions of those in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. These, clearly, are not independent. Other articles in The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments are completely rewritten and different from those in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. These are independent.]

Top

Caution: For many older terms there are alternate spellings. It is essential that you check these alternate spellings. To determine what these are, look up the name selected in The New Grove... .

Possible Terms:
Accords nouveaux
Alta
Ambitus
Antiphonale
Armenian chant
Ars antiqua
Auto [Spanish]
Barzelletta
Bergamasca
Branle
Broadside ballad
Brunetta [French]
Buckwheat note
Burlesque
Camerata
Catch
Chanson de geste
Chiarenzana
Clausula [as in Notre Dame Organum]
Clivis
Consort song
Crab canon
Cross fingering
Curtain tune
Dafne
Déploration
Doxology
Dump
Ensalada
Feldmusik
Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
Formes fixes
Geistliches Konzert
Giga / Gigue / Jig
Ground
Guidonian hand
Harmony of the spheres
Historia [German]
Intermedio
Janissary music
Jongleur
Jubilus
Kapellmeister
Krakowiak
Lamento
Lenguetería de la fachada
Machicotage
Masque
Milanese chant
Monody
Moresca [Morisca]
Musique mesurée
Neume
Notes inégales
Organum
Parthenia
Passamezzo
Polytextuality
Prélude non mesuré
Prima prattica
Proper [of the Mass]
Quodlibet
Ranz des vaches
Recitative
Relish
Ricercar / Ricercare
Romanesca
Ruggiero
Sanctus
Sarum
Scordatura
Shape-note
Spingardo
Street cries
Tafelmusik
Tirade, tirata
Ungaresca
Vau de Vire
Vers mesuré
Villancico
Walking Bass
Winchester Troper
Word Painting
Zarzuela


Put your explanation in the box below. [The box will scroll to make room for extra text.]



  1. Using short titles, in the box below cite at least three independent sources for information concerning the term assigned to you (including, of course, those you used to answer the question). [If you cannot find three independent sources, please consult with the instructor of the course.]
/ 35

* If suitable material is not available in three or more dictionaries, encyclopaedias, and other reference sources, you may find it necessary to look in monographs (text books) or even in journals about the subject assigned to you. This is where bibliographies with articles in reference sources are very helpful.
 
 
* Note: In all cases, indicate the exact location of your source of information. On this worksheet, provide this citation as a short title. Short title references are normally used in Footnotes (not in Bibliographies).
 
 
Top
The following may serve as examples of short titles:
  1. Article within a dictionary or encyclopaedia:
    H.E. Poole and Krummel, "Printing and Publishing of Music", New Grove, XV 235.
  2. Article within a periodical, magazine, newsletter, or other serial:
    R. Poole, "The Oxford Music School; and the Collection of Portraits Formerly Preserved There", The Musical Antiquary, IV (1912/13), 148.
  3. Reference to a book:
    Taylor, The Taste of Angels, p. 211.
The following are examples of the equivalent citations in a bibliography:
  1. Article within a dictionary or encyclopaedia: Poole, H. Edmund and Donald W. Krummel, "Printing and Publishing of Music", The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. 20 vols. Edited by Stanlie Sadie. London: MacMillan Publishers Ltd., 1980. (XV 232-274.)
    [Or simply refer to the entire dictionary or encyclopaedia:]
    The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. 20 vols. Edited by Stanlie Sadie. London: MacMillan Publishers Ltd., 1980.
  2. Article within a periodical, magazine, newsletter, or other serial:
    Poole, Rachael L. "The Oxford Music School; and the Collection of Portraits Formerly Preserved There", The Musical Antiquary, IV (1912/13), 143-159.
  3. Reference to a book:
    Taylor, Francis Henry. The Taste of Angels: A History of Art Collecting from Rameses to Napoleon. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1948.

[Note: In many dictionaries and encyclopaedias, single articles may be written by several different authors. This must be noted when the material is used. Each author must be given individual credit for their contribution.]


[Total:    / 100]


Check to ensure that you have answered all questions.
Make sure you have entered your name at the top of the Worksheet.
Top
When you are sure that the answers on your Worksheet are correct, submit the answers by clicking on the Submit button below.


Last updated: 24 August 2005.
Copyright © 2005 by Gordon J. Callon. All rights reserved. e-mail: gcallon @ ca.inter.net or gordon.callon @ acadiau.ca
site map
Music 1253 Music 1253 Introduction | Music 1253 Description Music 1253 Course Description | Back Score Links | Back Acadia University Home Page | Back Faculty of Arts Home Page